HUNTER SAFETY CERTIFICATION CLASS – Winter Haven, FL

A Florida hunter safety education certification class will be conducted Saturday, October 15th, in Winter Haven, Florida.

Total Cost: $75

All equipment provided or you can bring your own.

Hunter Safety Education Certification Qualification Class – Shotgun.

This class will provide the practical, hands-on, live-firing of a firearm required to fulfill the training requirements for applying for a Florida hunter safety education certification card.

An official National Rifle Association certificate of training will be issued upon successful completion of the class.

The class size is limited and pre-registration is required.

  • Class Time: 9:00 AM
  • Location: 3812 Cypress Gardens Road, Winter Haven
  • Total Cost: $75
  • Equipment:
    • Bring your own shotgun or use ours.
    • Ammunition will be provided.
    • Hearing and eye protection required. Bring your own or use ours.

For further information, call: 863-206-1996

To register for the class, go to EVENTBRITE at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hunter-safety-certification-class-basic-shotgun-tickets-416976456807

CONCEALED CARRY CLASSES – Winter Haven, Lakeland, Lake Wales, Bartow

Fast, Convenient, The Minimum You Need

You can waste your time, money and the loss of your sense of welbeing by attending a concealed carry class conducted in a rented hotel room or . . .

You can attend a class the both qualifies you for applying for a Florida concealed carry license and trains you in the use of a firearm to defend your life and the lives of your loved ones

Florida HUNTER SAFETY EDUCATION Classes – Having difficulty getting in one?

Do you need a Hunter Safety Education Class for that young hunter in your life or yourself?

863-206-1996

With hunting season just around the corner, are you or someone you know is in need of his or her Florida Hunter Safety Edcation card?

Are you finding it difficult or nearly impossible to complete the hands-on, field day portion of the training?

Contact us for the training you need to apply for and receive your Florida Hunter Education Card. We can get you or that young hunter in your life certified before the season begins.

In-Gauge of Polk County Winter Haven, Florida

863-206-1996

Good Guy With Gun Stops Bad Guy With Gun Preventing Mass Shooting

NO “concealed carry” class is going to train you in the use of a handgun. You need to take a handgun/firearm training class for that.

Greenwood Mall, Greenwood, Indiana – July 17, 2022

  • Shots fired (good guy) 10 rounds
  • Distance: 120 feet
  • Shots hitting target (bad guy): 8
  • Time span: 15 seconds

There is more to owning and carrying a gun than just knowing how to pull the trigger.

Allow us to make you proficient in the use of your gun. We conduct both basic and advanced handgun training, concealed carry classes, rifle and shotgun classes.

It should be understood that no “concealed carry” class is going to train you in the use of a handgun. You need to take a handgun/firearm training class for that.

Sheriff Grady Judd: “If you are not afraid of a gun, get one.”

It should be understood that NO “concealed carry” class is going to train you in the use of a handgun. You need to take a handgun/firearm training class for that.

If the class you are considering taking does not specifically state that it is going to train you in the use, operation and firing of a handgun, it is not going to.

See our course descriptions at: https://ingaugeofpolkcounty.com/course-titles/ or call us at: 863-206-1996 for class availability.

Armed robber shot, killed by customer at convenience store

“. . . the 26-year-old suspect shot by a customer during that attempted robbery.”

July 16, 2022 – By Kelsee Ward and Jordan Gartner – KSLA New 12

https://www.ksla.com/2022/07/16/armed-robber-shot-killed-by-customer-convenience-store-police-say/

ST. CHARLES, Mo. (KMOV/Gray News) – Police in Missouri are investigating a violent crime spree in St. Charles that ended with an armed robber being shot and killed.

The St. Charles Police Department reports the crime spree started during the early morning hours on Saturday at a convenience store where a 26-year-old went into the business with a knife and told the clerk he was robbing her.

Police said the man held the knife to the clerk’s throat while she opened the register. He then pushed the clerk to the floor and stole money from the register. He dragged her toward the back of the store, asking the location of the safe.

According to authorities, the clerk did not have access to the safe, so the thief forced the worker to open a second register before stealing that cash and leaving the scene.

Officials said first responders took the clerk to a hospital for lacerations on her left wrist, right hand and neck.

Police said they were on their way to that scene when reports of another armed robbery came in at a Phillips 66 gas station. Officers said they found broken glass that looked like a burglary had occurred.

St. Charles police said a third burglary call then came in regarding an armed robbery at a QuikTrip convenience store where shots had been fired.

According to police, arriving officers found the 26-year-old suspect shot by a customer during that attempted robbery. First responders took the suspected thief to the hospital, where he later died.

Authorities said they interviewed the customer, a 26-year-old man, who told police he stopped at the gas station to use the restroom and buy something. However, he was walking back to his car from the store when he saw a black SUV drive quickly into the parking lot.

The customer said he saw a man carrying a backpack while running into the store and threatening the clerk with a knife, according to police.

Officials said the 26-year-old customer grabbed his gun and went back into the store. He then confronted the thief, who grabbed for his backpack.

According to authorities, the suspect reportedly told the customer, “I have something for you,” and came around the counter when he was shot and killed by the customer.

Investigators said the customer and the clerk were both uninjured in the incident and the suspect’s car came back as stolen in an armed robbery on Friday, with stolen items also found in the vehicle.

Florida: Homeowner Defends Self Against 3 Armed Home Invaders

3 wanted for home invasion in Escambia County, Florida

Escambia County Sheriff’s Office releases surveillance video of Pensacola home invasion, seeking three suspects

July 13, 2022

The Escambia County Sheriff’s Office released surveillance of a July 7 home invasion showing four men invading and attacking a resident on Pinestead Road.

According to an ECSO Facebook post release, three males approached the front door of the home, and when the victim unlocked the door, two of the three men pushed him into the house and attacked him. The third male then pulled a handgun from his pants and waited outside.

“During this home invasion, the victim’s pistol fell to the ground and was picked up by one of the invaders,” the release notes. “The victim ran to the back room of the house where he had another firearm and began firing at his intruders.”

The three intruders “ran frantically from the home to their vehicle where the fourth suspect was waiting and drove off, hitting a mailbox.”

The release noted that suspect Da’Torrance Hackworth was arrested in connection with the home invasion for use or display of a firearm during a felony, possession of a firearm by a felon, larceny, grand theft of a firearm and robbery or home invasion with a firearm.

What can happen when you have no way to defend your family . . . .

Armed robbers trap family of 5 in bedroom, then ransack their home

Brooksville, Florida – July 12, 2022

Brooksville, Florida – A family of five was imprisoned in a bedroom of their Florida home while four armed men ransacked the house in middle of the night, according to the Hernando County Sheriff’s Office.

Hernando County Sheriff’s Office

On 07-12-22 at approximately 2:30 a.m., Hernando County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to a residence on Seaway Drive in Brooksville in regards to a reported Home Invasion.

Upon arrival, deputies met with the victim, an adult male, who advised he had just returned home from work in Tampa. When he pulled into his driveway at approximately 2:15 a.m., an unknown vehicle pulled up in the roadway at his driveway.

When the victim exited his vehicle, four males exited the other car. The four males were dressed in black, wore masks on their faces, and were all armed with various firearms. The suspects ordered the victim to the ground.

After demanding money and jewelry from the victim, the suspects escorted the victim to the front door of the residence. The victim unlocked the door and entered the residence; the suspects followed him in.

According to the victim, he and four members of his family (who were already in the residence) were placed in a bedroom and told to remain there. During this time, the suspects took various things from inside the residence.

Once the suspects fled the scene, the victim and his family exited the bedroom and contacted law enforcement.

Detectives and Forensic Specialists responded to the scene to conduct interviews with the victims and to collect/process physical evidence.

Considering taking a concealed carry class? You may want to consider this . . .

There is more to owning and using a gun than just knowing how to pull a trigger.

Not all concealed carry classes are alike.

Unless specifically stated otherwise, “concealed carry classes” do NOT teach how to handle and use a handgun.

They do NOT teach:

  • the handling of a handgun
  • the firing of a handgun
  • the loading, unloading and reloading of a handgun
  • how manage handgun malfunfunctions

To learn the techniques listed above, you have to take a handgun/pistol training class.

Maybe you or someone you know already took a concealed carry class. Did it look like this . . .

or like this?

If the “concealed carry” class you took did not include a trip the the range and the firing of a real handgun, using live ammunition, firing a minimum of 50 rounds, you attended a certificate mill class, that in all likelyhood, was more of an insurance sales seminar, not a handgun training class.

There is more to owning and using a gun than just knowing how to pull a trigger.

Others conduct classes to qualify people to apply for a concealed carry license. We conduct classes to not only to qualify people to apply for a concealed carrry license, we train people to carry a firearm in public.

We don’t want to train everyone who wants a concealed carry license.  We only want to train those who are serious about learning how to defend their life and the lives of their loved ones.

If your concealed carry class did not look like the photos above, you may want to contact us for real, concealed carry, handgun training. Training that prepares you to defend your life and the lives of your loved ones.

Not all concealed carry classes are alike.


Considering taking a concealed carry class? You may want to consider this . . .

We don’t want to train everyone who wants a concealed carry license.  We only want to train those who are serious about learning how to defend their life and the lives of their loved ones.

Not all concealed carry classes are alike.

Unless specifically stated otherwise, “concealed carry classes” do NOT teach how to handle and use a handgun.

They do NOT teach:

  • the handling of a handgun
  • the firing of a handgun
  • the loading, unloading and reloading of a handgun
  • how manage handgun malfunfunctions

To learn the techniques listed above, you have to take a handgun/pistol training class.

Maybe you or someone you know already took a concealed carry class. Did it look like this . . .

or like this?

If the “concealed carry” class you took did not include a trip the the range and the firing of a real handgun, using live ammunition, firing a minimum of 50 rounds, you attended a certificate mill class, that in all likelyhood, was more of an insurance sales seminar, not a handgun training class.

There is more to owning and using a gun than just knowing how to pull a trigger.

Others conduct classes to qualify people to apply for a concealed carry license. We conduct classes to not only to qualify people to apply for a concealed carrry license, we train people to carry a firearm in public.

We don’t want to train everyone who wants a concealed carry license.  We only want to train those who are serious about learning how to defend their life and the lives of their loved ones.

If your concealed carry class did not look like the photos above, you may want to contact us for real, concealed carry, handgun training. Training that prepares you to defend your life and the lives of your loved ones.

Not all concealed carry classes are alike.


If You Want Protection for Your Loved Ones, Do It Yourself

“Nothing in the ‘Due Process Clause’ requires the State to protect the life, liberty, and property of its citizens”

REASON.com – J.D. TUCCILLE | 5.31.2022

Police in Uvalde, Texas, face a barrage of criticism for delays in confronting the shooter who slaughtered children and teachers last week. Officials admit law enforcers screwed up; worse, they impeded parents who wanted to intervene, leaving the crime to be ended by agents who ignored police orders. As politicians rush to leverage tragedy to advance legislative agendas, we’re reminded again that it’s foolish to place our trust in authority or to surrender our ability to protect ourselves and our loved ones.

“From the benefit of hindsight, where I’m sitting now, of course it was not the right decision,” Steven McCraw, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, admitted of police choosing to wait for backup and equipment before intervening in a massacre that took the lives of 19 schoolchildren and two teachers. “It was the wrong decision, period. There’s no excuse for that.”

That decision delayed the response for over an hour. Finally, a Border Patrol team that drove 40 miles to the scene defied orders and stopped the shooter’s rampage.

“Federal agents who went to Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday to confront a gunman who killed 19 children were told by local police to wait and not enter the school — and then decided after about half an hour to ignore that initial guidance and find the shooter,” noted NBC News.

The feds weren’t the only ones willing to intervene. Instead of taking on Ramos, local police tackled, pepper-sprayed, and handcuffed parents rather than allow them to take action at which officers balked.

“The police were doing nothing,” said Angeli Rose Gomez who was briefly arrested for challenging official indecision.

“Once freed from her cuffs, Ms. Gomez made her distance from the crowd, jumped the school fence, and ran inside to grab her two children,” reported The Wall Street Journal. “She sprinted out of the school with them.”

This isn’t the first time police faced criticism for dithering in response to danger. By the time officers entered Colorado’s Columbine High School in in 1999, 47 minutes had passed allowing the shooters to do their worst before killing themselves. Columbine was supposed to spur changes in police policy, but that wasn’t apparent during a 2018 incident at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

“Information reported over 10 months by the South Florida Sun Sentinel reveals 58 minutes of chaos on campus marked by no one taking charge, deputies dawdling, false information spreading, communications paralyzed and children stranded with nowhere to hide,” that newspaper concluded.

Our discourse over law enforcement in recent years can be characterized as a debate between people who vilify cops and those who sanctify them. They’re either racist thugs or a thin blue line standing against barbarism. The crimes of Derek Chauvin and his buddies as well as the heroism of the federal agents who raced to Uvalde shows that both breeds exist. But the majority of officers are regular people working a unionized public-sector job. Like most of us, they go through their days and collect their pay.

“Cops are civilians with guns who have had minimal training,” Eugene O’Donnell, a law professor with John Jay College of Criminal Justice and former police officer told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. “Some of them are heroic. But not all. You’re asking for Zeus-like cops to speed to these scenes and be ready to put down mass killers. And cops are being told to stay out of trouble by the courts, the media, the culture. That’s their alpha and their omega.”

Angeli Rose Gomez’s children gave her a personal stake, which is why she was willing to run into Robb Elementary School; other parents scuffled with police for the opportunity to do the same. An unidentified woman in Charleston, West Virginia, also had skin in the game (her own) when she drew a concealed pistol and put down a man who opened fire on a crowd a day after the Uvalde massacre, preventing the death of anybody other than the attacker. Most officers don’t have personal stakes in the incidents to which they respond, and it’s asking a lot to expect them to put their lives on the line for strangers. They don’t even have a legal obligation to protect us.

“Nothing in the language of the Due Process Clause itself requires the State to protect the life, liberty, and property of its citizens against invasion by private actors,” then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist wrote for the majority in DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social Services (1989).

So, we’d be foolish to surrender our right to defend ourselves and our loved ones, as many politicians demand, in hope that public employees with no stake in the situation and families waiting at home will take up the slack. No law or hollow promise relying on the limitations of human beings in public sector jobs can replace the attachments we have to our children, spouses, friends, and our own lives.

Politicians also vow to fortify schools against attack with fencing, metal detectors, and armed guards. The approach hardens targets, but it confines children in something like prison camps. It also leaves those within the perimeter at risk if it’s breached. Then-Interpol Secretary General Ronald Noble wrestled with that dilemma after a 2013 terrorist attack at the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya.

“Noble said there are really only two choices for protecting open societies from attacks like the one on Westgate mall where so-called ‘soft targets’ are hit: either create secure perimeters around the locations or allow civilians to carry their own guns to protect themselves,” ABC News reported at the time. Noble seemed to favor armed civilians since that allows for dynamic responses to unpredictable situations—assuming police don’t tackle enraged parents trying to protect their children.

Based on the seemingly inevitable trail of threats, manifestos, and bad behavior left behind by Ramos and his ilk, some pundits advocate intensified scrutiny of potentially troubling messages. “The answer is obvious,” insists Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. at The Wall Street Journal. “Surveillance powered by big data, whose advancing role in our world seems unstoppable in any case.”

But, as economist Arnold Kling points out, a lot of people say troubling, violent, and extremist things, but very few actually do anything to endanger others.

“For surveillance to work, you have to be willing to see thousands of people tracked for every one who actually attempts murder,” Kling cautions. “And you will have to intervene every time the surveillance algorithm reveals a potential for the person to become violent.”

We would end up with a Big-Brother state staffed by risk-averse bureaucrats. They would live in dread of missing a dangerous person, and the threshold would drop whenever somebody slipped through.

The truth is that proposals for a prison society of disarmed and surveilled subjects shepherded by public employees are unworkable. The state can’t defend us from danger, and nothing obligates us to pretend otherwise.

If you want to protect yourself and your loved ones, you have to do it yourself.

J.D. TUCCILLE is a contributing editor at Reason.